The Upside of Irrationality - REVIEWS

Rational Vs. Irrational Beliefs

February 28, 2018

Rational-Emotive Behavior Therapy (REBT) teaches individuals how to think rationally and prevent their thinking from becoming crippling.

- we are constantly responding to our environment based on our interpretation of events as they happen. When someone thinks rationally they are able to objectively analyze situations and remain optimistic about a given outcome.

Individuals that tend to think irrationally aren't able to supply themselves with realistic solutions and often drift towards behaving in a way that is unhelpful and less likely to move them towards their goal.

Here's an example:

  • Event: I made a mistake during my presentation

  • Rational Thinker: Lots of people make mistakes. I doubt anyone even noticed, it didn't take away from the overall message, and I'll do better next time.

  • Irrational Thinker: I am such an idiot! People probably think I am incompetent and I'll never be asked to present again.

Rational thinking allows for a restoration of one's perception of self as positive. Irrational thinking causes an individual to focus on flaws making their evaluation of self more negative than it needs to be.

we assist our clients with

improving their ability to think rationally by teaching them to challenge irrational beliefs, essentially beating up their inner-bully.

Subscribe to this blog to ensure that you continue to receive the latest content. To inquire about therapy

click here.

Share
Likes

The Power of WordsCouple's Should Take Timeouts to Prevent Unhealthy Communication





Rational vs. Irrational Beliefs — Stevon Lewis, M.S., LMFT
stevonlewis.com
Rational-Emotive

Behavior Therapy ( REBT ) teaches individuals how to think rationally and prevent their thinking from becoming crippling...



 

the environment for big, general interest sites like Yahoo, AOL and About.com has grown tougher in recent years as the key driver of web traffic has shifted to social media, which tends to benefit topic-specific sites more.

Various digital media outlets from Vice to Business Insider and Gizmodo Media Group have structured themselves to varying degrees with distinctive web presences built around subject matters.

“We are very on trend with what is happening in the market right now,”

The new title, Dotdash, will effectively be a corporate trade name, Mr. Vogel said, and won’t be consumer focused. The name is partly a homage to the “dot” that appeared in the About.com logo, with the dash representing forward motion. He also noted that in Morse code, “Dot-Dash” translates as the letter A.

wsj.com

About.com Changes Its Name to Dotdash

Corporate name is rebranded after storied website breaks up into a group of niche sites and the About.com site is retired

PHOTO: DOTDASH
By
Lukas I. Alpert
May 2, 2017 12:04 a.m. ET

About.com is about to become something else.

The all-purpose, general interest website that dates back to the earliest days of the internet is disappearing for good Tuesday after a year-long process that broke the operation into a constellation of niche-focused sites.

The company, which has been owned by Barry Diller’sIAC/InterActiveCorp IAC -0.12% since 2012, will now be called Dotdash as the About.com site is retired.

The logic, according to Dotdash Chief Executive Neil Vogel, is that a broad omnibus site tends to underperform on the social media platforms like Facebook and Snapchat that drive the internet today, making it less valuable to advertisers.

About.com is a funny thing. Everyone knows what it is, but it doesn’t mean anything to anyone,” he said.

Starting a year ago, About.com began splintering off topics into a variety of stand-alone sites, starting with the health and wellness focused site, Verywell. The company has since added The Spruce for home improvement, The Balance for personal finance, Lifewire for technology and ThoughtCo for learning. Soon TripSavvy will be added with articles on travel.

Launched in 1997 as a catchall answer site before the days of powerful search engines like Google, About.com’s trajectory serves as a road map of sorts for the short history of the internet.

Riding the wave of the first dot-com boom, About.com was sold in 2000 to magazine publisher Primedia Inc. in a deal that valued the site at $690 million.

Five years later, following the collapse of the dot-com bubble, About.com was bought by New York Times Co. for $410 million.

The site found firm footing as the era of “search” took hold on the internet, with its pages often surfacing high in search queries. But it struggled to establish a discernible brand due to its vast scope, said Mr. Vogel, who took over after the site was acquired by IAC in 2012 for $300 million.

CMO TODAY NEWSLETTER

Get your daily dose of media and advertising news with WSJ’s CMO Today newsletter. Sign up here.

He said the environment for big, general interest sites like Yahoo, AOL and About.com has grown tougher in recent years as the key driver of web traffic has shifted to social media, which tends to benefit topic-specific sites more.

Various digital media outlets from Vice to Business Insider and Gizmodo Media Group have structured themselves to varying degrees with distinctive web presences built around subject matters.

“We are very on trend with what is happening in the market right now,” Mr. Vogel said.

The new title, Dotdash, will effectively be a corporate trade name, Mr. Vogel said, and won’t be consumer focused. The name is partly a homage to the “dot” that appeared in the About.com logo, with the dash representing forward motion. He also noted that in Morse code, “Dot-Dash” translates as the letter A.

Write to Lukas I. Alpert at lukas.alpert@wsj.com

  1. TECH
  2. ABOUT

About.com Has a New Name and a New Strategy


By MATHEW INGRAM
May 2, 2017

Most of the iconic names from the early web like Geocities and Pets.com have long since ceased to exist. But About.com, one of the earliest would-be online information portals, remained largely unchanged despite the rise of new players like Facebook and Twitter.

All of that is coming to an end, however. In a recent interview with Fortune, About.com CEO Neil Vogel described how the site is reinventing itself, and also unveiled a new name that goes live on Tuesday.

About.com will now be known as Dotdash—with a logo that consists of a large red dot, followed by the word Dash—and its strategy is to be a collection of verticals with targeted content rather than a one-size-fits-all portal.

The company has spent the last year launching several new sites, including VeryWell—which focuses on personal health topics—and Balance, which specializes in articles about personal finance.

Dotdash is still at the mercy of search-engine and social referral traffic from Google and Facebook, and its articles aren’t likely to win any Pulitzer Prizes. But Vogel says he believes the new strategy makes the company a lot more appealing to advertisers than it has been in years.

As for the new name, Vogel said the word Dot in “Dotdash” came from the fact that About.com’s logo had a red dot for the period, and the company wanted to maintain some connection to its previous identity. The word Dash seemed symbolic of “something coming next,” he says. And he also liked the fact that “dot dash” in Morse code refers to the letter A.

Vogel says he became the CEO of About after it was acquired for $300 million in 2012 by Barry Diller’s IAC (which owns a stable of sites like Match.com and Ask.com). It was immediately apparent that the previous owner—the New York Times, which bought it in 2005 for $410 million—had not really invested much in the site.

“When IAC bought it, it was still getting about 100 million users a month, and it had a bunch of revenue, but it was about half the size it was at its peak,” Vogel said. “It had not been invested in by the Times at all—no one had touched the content or the technology since like 2006.”

The more he dug into the business of the site, however, the more Vogel says he realized that the “evergreen” type of content that About specialized in—articles about how to fix your broken toilet, or how to identify chicken pox—continued to draw a lot search traffic from Google.

Get Data Sheet, Fortune’s technology newsletter.

“The content was still incredibly good, because a lot of it was written by experts,” he says. “We had 60 MDs that wrote for us, we had travel stuff that was written by people who lived in these places, dozens of personal finance experts. I figured if we could fix the tech and the look, we might get something advertisers might want to advertise on.”

Over the next year, the company totally rewrote the code that powered the site, did a top-to-bottom redesign, and launched a new version. “That more or less stopped the decline,” says Vogel. “All of a sudden people weren’t embarrassed to say they worked here.”

While traffic and revenue stopped falling, however, they didn’t start growing. “It turned out we were just doing the wrong thing better,” he says. “We were the same as Yahoo or MSN: A big portal with lots of general-interest content. But there’s no place for a site like that in 2016.” Hence, the targeted content strategy.

Advertisers also saw About.com as a damaged brand, because it was so behind the times. “We kept losing out on these deals because advertisers just couldn’t bring themselves to put their brands next to ours,” Vogel says. “At one point, we had one of the biggest companies in the world tell us never to call them again.”

The conclusion he came to was that if the site wanted to do anything other than tread water, it would need to be reinvented. “It was profitable, but it was going sideways,” Vogel says. “We told IAC that we could keep it going and it would be fine, or we could really try to blow it up.”

Facebook and Google Are Victims of a $100 Million Payment Scam

According to Fortune investigation

Play Video

YOU MIGHT LIKE

FACEBOOK IS BANNING POSTS PRAISING WHITE NATIONALISM

GOOGLE REMOVED FROM LARGEST LGBTQ RIGHTS GROUP

Vogel and his team examined the site and found that the most successful pages fell into five general categories: Health, technology, personal finance, lifestyle, and travel. “We figured we could take those five areas and build brands around them, and turn that into something worthwhile, and the rest of the content we would just throw in the garbage.”

The transformation began at the beginning of 2016, and the first brand, VeryWell, was launched in April. Content was updated to make it current, and the idea was to be “a kinder, gentler version of WebMD,” the About.com CEO says. The site got 12 million unique visitors a month when it launched, and it is now at around 17 million visitors, he said.

The second vertical, a personal-finance site called Balance, launched with 6.5 million unique visitors in August and last month it had more than twice as many, said Vogel.

Lifewire, the personal-technology site, premiered in November and has gone from about 3.5 million unique visitors a month to more than 7 million. A home and food site called The Spruce is up about 40% since its debut, and the next on the list is a vertical oriented around travel called TripSavvy, which will be introduced later this month.

The response from advertisers seems to show the new approach is working, says Vogel. “We’ve been talking to people who have not talked to us since I’ve been here, which is four years,” he said. “Advertisers want data, which we’ve always had, but now we have brands that advertisers can trust.”

En Stock Eachine E58 WIFI FPV Avec Grand Angle HD Caméra Haute Tenue ...
€ 36,31
(588)
1,583 commandes

AliexpressEn Stock Eachine E58 WIFI FPV Avec Grand Angle HD Caméra Haute Tenue Mode Pliable Bras RC Quadcopter RTF Stable vol Pour Cadeau Jouet dans RC Hélicoptères ...
 
€ 36,31
(588)
1,583 commandes